Month: January 2013

Enabling and configuring NFS

This weekend, I had a need to get NFS working on my Mac. My reasoning? I have a WDTV Live, and found that streaming video through NFS adds less overhead than using (the excellent and free) PS3 Media ServerWestern Digital’s instructions are GUI-heavy and somewhat incomplete, though, so I decided to write my own.

To configure NFS, you’ll need to create a file in /etc/exports:

sudo nano /etc/exports

If the file doesn’t already exist, it should be empty. This file contains your list of shares. Here’s an example of a share from my machine:

/Users/mike/Downloads -ro -network 192.168.1.0 -mask 255.255.255.0

Breaking it down – first, you’ve got the path to the folder you want to share. Next, it’s set so that anyone connecting has read-only access. And finally, the two last sections detail the IP range that’s allowed to access shares on your NFS server. There are many more options you can add – see this for a full listing:

man exports

Add one share per line. Once you’re happy with your exports file, all you need to do is enable NFS:

sudo nfsd enable

This will start the NFS service and keep it running, even after a reboot. You can also start and stop it on an as-needed basis:

sudo nfsd start
sudo nfsd stop

If you make changes to your exports file, you might need to restart the NFS daemon for your changes to take effect:

sudo nfsd restart

If you’d like to verify that your exports file is properly formatted, this will be useful:

nfsd checkexports

And finally, if NFS is running, you can get a listing of all of your shares (‘mounts’ in NFS terminology) via this:

showmount -e

Hope this is useful to someone! If you’d prefer a GUI anyway, NFS Manager looks to be very well done.

Tested with: 10.7, 10.8, 10.9

Disabling Spotlight

In some cases, Spotlight’s indexing becomes a nuisance at best, and a problem at worst. A diagnostic OS can be used to repair or recover from a failing hard drive, for example, but Spotlight indexing can slow down the process (and lessen your chances of recovering data).

Luckily, it’s pretty simple to disable Spotlight. In the Terminal, run this command:

sudo launchctl unload -w /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.apple.metadata.mds.plist

If you later change your mind, this command will reverse it:

sudo launchctl load -w /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.apple.metadata.mds.plist

Note that this disables Spotlight systemwide, not just on a per-HD basis. Existing Spotlight indexes will be left untouched.

It should be noted, in OS X 10.7 and above, the App Store uses Spotlight to recognize which apps are installed and can be updated. With Spotlight disabled, the App Store will only show OS updates. If you’re updating your Diagnostic OS, I’d suggest temporarily changing this setting.

Tested with: 10.4, 10.5, 10.6, 10.7, 10.8, 10.9

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